Sequoiadendrons

Sequoiadendrons

Giant sequoias (Sequoiadendron giganteum) are famous for being some of the largest organisms on the planet. Known colloquially as big trees, Sierra redwoods, Sequoiadendrons, or simply sequoias, these trees have been one of the most important species in Northern California for millions of years.

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Taiwania cryptomerioides

Taiwania Trees

Taiwania trees (Taiwania cryptomerioides) are large evergreens, native to East Asia. Relatively poorly known among North American tree enthusiasts, these immense trees can make interesting specimen trees in yards and commercial areas, provided that you can find specimens for sale.

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True Cypresses

Although many different tree species include the word “cypress” in their common name, the true cypresses are a closely related subgroup of these trees. Historically, the term “true” cypresses referred to conifers of the genus Cupressus. However, the classification scheme for these trees and their close relatives has been revised several times, and different authorities…

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Dwarf Redwoods

The dwarf or dawn redwood (Metasequoia glyptostroboides) is one of three species that bears the redwood moniker. The sole living species of its genus, dwarf redwoods are very attractive conifers, who are quite similar to coastal redwoods (Sequoia sempervirens). Some botanists even contend that the dwarf redwood is the direct ancestor of the coastal redwood.…

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Juniper Trees

The genus Juniperus contains between 50 and 68 different species, depending on the authority consulted. Juniper trees inhabit much of the world’s land area, including parts of North America, Europe, Asia and Africa. Junipers are common plants and trees across arid regions of the American southwest; in many places, they are the primary tree species…

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Oriental Swamp Cypresses

Also called the water pine, the Oriental swamp cypress (Gylptostrobus pensilis) is the sole member of its genus. Native to China and neighboring portions of Vietnam, the trees show many similarities to their close relatives, the bald cypresses (Taxodium spp.). Like bald cypresses, Oriental swamp cypresses commonly grow in low-lying, damp areas. They often grow…

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Cunninghamia

China-Firs

China-firs (Cunninghamia ssp.) are impressive trees, attaining heights of 150 feet in their native lands. Although they are native to Asia, they have been planted in the Unites States since the beginning of the 19th century. Fortunately, they do not exhibit invasive habits, so you can plant them in your yard without feeling guilty. Taxonomic…

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False Cypresses

The false cypresses (Chamaecyparis spp.) are a group of beautiful, evergreen trees native to portions of North America and Asia. Perhaps unfairly tarnished by the “false” moniker, it is important to understand botanists do not intend the common name as a pejorative; they simply use it to distinguish between two common lineages. False cypresses are…

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Cryptomeria-Saint-Gilles

Sugi Trees

Known in its native Japan as Sugi, Cryptomeria japonica is a beautiful, evergreen conifer that is the sole member of its genus. It also goes by the names Japanese or oriental cedar, although this conifer is not that closely related to the true cedars (Cedrus spp.). Sugi have been cultivated in China for centuries, and…

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